June 23, 2018, 10:40:33 PM

Author Topic: series 60 motor  (Read 5973 times)

Offline ruthi

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series 60 motor
« on: May 04, 2009, 06:56:16 PM »
OK, so we paid 1500 for the motor. Engine only! So, was this a good price? We called around, and we found a lot higher prices. Anyhow, think we will see if we can get our money back out of it. We were told by the guy that runs the coach line we got it from that it has about 300,000 on it. So, what yall think? Thanks
Mixed up Dina, ready for the road as of 12/25/2010
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Offline TomC

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Re: series 60 motor
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2009, 08:01:33 PM »
$1500 is a great price for the engine-and with 300,000 miles on a 1,000,000 mile engine-lots of life left in it so long as it was taken care of properly.  I've also seen Series 60's worn out at 300,000 miles.  The big question is- do you have all the electronics, gas pedal, sensors, etc to be able to install it properly?  You can amass quite of bit of cost if all the components are not there.  The best way to make sure you have everything is to buy a complete running bus or truck with the desired engine/transmission in it ready to swap out to your vehicle.  Good Luck, TomC
Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.

Offline gmpd4104

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Re: series 60 motor
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2009, 03:27:03 AM »
why was it removed at 300,000 is the best question.

and if it was good why did he not keep it as a spare 

Offline ruthi

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Re: series 60 motor
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2009, 07:31:48 AM »
It was removed because they were going to just scrap the bus, and had already taken the motor out of it before we bought it. So, they agreed to sell it to us so we would have a motor for the bus. We have delt with them before, and they are nice people. It was in service when the fire happened. I know the coach line regularly sevices their busses. They have their own service company.
Mixed up Dina, ready for the road as of 12/25/2010
Home in middle Georgia, located somewhere in the
southeast most of the time.
FIRST RALLY ATTENDED: BUSSIN 2011!

Offline Utahclaimjumper

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Re: series 60 motor
« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2009, 07:38:46 AM »
You need to get away from "motor", a motor is an electrical devise, what you have is an "engine" as in internal combustion engine.>>>Dan
Utclmjmpr 
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Offline JackConrad

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Re: series 60 motor
« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2009, 10:23:33 AM »
You need to get away from "motor", a motor is an electrical devise, what you have is an "engine" as in internal combustion engine.>>>Dan

Is that as in outboard engine or enginecycle or are those electric?  LOL
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Offline kyle4501

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Re: series 60 motor
« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2009, 11:17:00 AM »
My uncle worked for CSX & it wasn't considered an engine until it was rated well over 1000 HP   :o  ;D  8)
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Offline junkman42

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Re: series 60 motor
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2009, 11:28:48 AM »
Boats according to the navy operate under the water and ships float on the surface, just curious if the boats have motors and ships have engines?  LOL,  Just curious how many realize many diesel electric locomotives are 2 strokes.  I sold a electron beam welding to a company that overhauled  locomotive diesel cylinders and i found it interesting that the pistons had no wrist pin.  A different type of engine for sure.  Ot You think? John

Offline Van

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Re: series 60 motor
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2009, 11:53:45 AM »
Again with the engine/motor deal?how many times we gonna split this hair,huh?LOL
60 Series engine,with 300,000 mi?sounds interesting,have you guys looked the engine over,has it been refired since you have owned it? Please send a PM with your asking price,thanks.
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Offline busdriver58

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Re: series 60 motor
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2009, 12:22:45 PM »
Again with the engine/motor deal?how many times we gonna split this hair,huh?LOL...

Looks like "The never ending story" my friend... HA HA
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Offline Dreamscape

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Re: series 60 motor
« Reply #10 on: May 05, 2009, 02:11:24 PM »
engine (plural engines)

A mechanical device used to produce rotation to move vehicle or otherwise provide the force needed to generate kinetic energy.


motor (plural motors)

A machine or device that converts any form of energy into mechanical energy, or imparts motion

There you have it! Straight from Wiki!

Works for me! Not much difference if you ask me!

~Paul~
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Our coach was originally owned by the Dixie Echoes.

Offline Gary '79 5C

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Re: series 60 motor
« Reply #11 on: May 06, 2009, 01:47:21 AM »
Junkman,
I used to work in a large steel mill and have drifted thru the repair shop for the diesel tenders which had pistons size of a 55 gal drum. They used an overhead traveling crane to pull these. I never knew, nor would have suspected No Wrist Pins...

How then do they operate? Is that they cylinders are vertical with the pistons on top and weight and power stroke pushes the piston down against the connecting rod ? 

I need to search this. Again, and not amazingly so much I do not know. And whence I do learn, of what value ??

Gary
Experience is something you get Just after you needed it....
Ocean City, NJ

Offline 06 Bill

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Re: series 60 motor
« Reply #12 on: May 06, 2009, 03:28:07 AM »
I was told in school that a Motor had no stall point, with locked shaft it still tried to turn until failure.
An Engine pulled down just so far and bingo, dead, until restart.   006 Bill

Offline John316

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Re: series 60 motor
« Reply #13 on: May 06, 2009, 05:08:01 AM »

There you have it! Straight from Wiki!

Works for me! Not much difference if you ask me!

~Paul~


Paul,

Thanks for telling us what Wiki says. Now I can go and change it to be more "accurate" ;D :D :D ;D. I might let this be a committee decision, so weigh in now with your votes.

Of course I am kidding. And I don't have a dog in this fight ;D ;D ;D.

God bless,

John
Sold - MCI 1995 DL3. DD S60 with a Allison B500.

Offline junkman42

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Re: series 60 motor
« Reply #14 on: May 06, 2009, 06:13:14 AM »
Gary, the connecting rod has a ball on the upper end that sits in a cup in the piston.  A split plate which has a matching cup in it sits on the top and is held in with a large circlip.  The manufacturer of the engine that I developed a cylinder replacement process for was made by EMD.  If anyone thinks that a DD is oily they should take a look at a locomotive diesel.  Info of no value except to a gear head!  Regards,John