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Author Topic: Move over laws  (Read 6409 times)

Offline Lin

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Move over laws
« on: January 31, 2010, 09:28:30 AM »
I was unaware of this until I got an email about it this morning.  I'm posting it just in case others also did not know it existed.

http://www.moveoveramerica.com/
You don't have to believe everything you think.

cody

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Re: Move over laws
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2010, 09:55:45 AM »
It's not only a good idea, it's been the law in many states for quite a while, in michigan you must move over or slow down, 'if you can do so safely', the trick is to convince the officer that it would have been unsafe for you to do so, in heavy traffic thats not hard but on sparcely traveled roads like we have up here, it can be easily done.  Michigans law encompasses not only law enforcement vehicles but also any emergency vehicle falls under the umbrella of the law.  The "if you can do so safely" was added a couple of years ago after an overly zealous driver changed lanes and pulled into the path of an oncomeing semi and a family of 4 was buried along with the officer that was doing the traffic stop, it's a law that I agree with wholeheartly, we had to sit and watch the videos in our annual training seminars that showed us how to park behind a stopped vehicle useing the patrol car to shield or partially block traffic for our protection, in an ideal situation the tagged car would signal the officer that he was aware of being stopped, then proceed to a safe spot and pull as far over as he can for everyones safety.

Offline PCC

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Re: Move over laws
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2010, 11:38:20 AM »
When I moved to Texas, I was unaware that any such law ever existed, but I have learned to respect the law, and appreciate it. I have driven too many miles, and seen too many accidents caused by absent-minded drivers, and this just gives extra distance and protection for the officers that protect us every day.

For some, patience is a virtue.
Dealing with me, it is required.
Thank God - He is always patient.

Offline Lin

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Re: Move over laws
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2010, 11:49:46 AM »
Obviously it's a good idea to give emergency vehicles some extra room.  I must say though that I was a bit disappointed.  When I saw the name, "Move Over Laws", I thought is was about slow cars getting out of the fast lane.  I guess that would be a "Get out of the way law".
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Offline PCC

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Re: Move over laws
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2010, 12:10:01 PM »
I just wish that all drivers would be taught (just a little) to drive from a bus (or truck) driver's perspective, because then they might appreciate how they create situations for us to avoid; I sometimes have to use all my experience when I drive, and not just enjoy the driving.

They say because I am "bigger", I 'rule' the road. Most "big vehicle" drivers are far more respectful and courteous than some of the 'roller skate' drivers I see every day. (And yes, we do make mistakes too.)

"Get out of the way" - "Get out of the way" - "Get out of the way" - "Get out of the way" - think I got it !!!! ;D
For some, patience is a virtue.
Dealing with me, it is required.
Thank God - He is always patient.

Offline travelingfools

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Re: Move over laws
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2010, 12:15:51 PM »
And New York, who has a law for everything, dosent do it....unbelievable. About 2 years ago, while I was out on a traffic stop, a car "buzzed" me at over 100mph. The wind from the car passing me pushed me into the car I stopped. Talk about changing your shorts..lol. He crashed about 8 miles later and was charged with reckless endangerment and dwi. I was a very lucky boy that day....
John P, Lewiston NY   1987 MC 9 ...ex NJT

Offline JohnEd

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Re: Move over laws
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2010, 12:47:48 PM »
Never being one to be satisfied with.........  Let me add this:  Cops seem to regard the "stop" as the most important aspect of their shift. It isn't!  Going home safely at the end of your shift to your wife and children is the top.  You may be required to "risk" your personal safety but only if in dire circumstance.  A traffic ticket ain't on the list of "dire qualifiers".  It has Long been policy to allow a woman to proceed to a well lit and public location prior to pulling over.  In this town that will get you declared a "rabbit" and possibly shot with a taser or 9 MM but definitely arrested.

Most of the highways in our great nation have precious little shoulder, paved or otherwise.   In LA I was puled over for speeding on I5 once.  I5?  Got that?  It was at the Y merge in Irvine headed south.  I would have had to pull through 5 lanes and then to the shoulder that is 8 feet wide to pull to the right.  The medium was all hard pack 50 feet wide each side and with the 8 foot of blacktop along the concrete.  I got 10 feet between the right side of my car and the concrete.  Oh, what a good boy am I.  Looking out for my wife and kids and the Trooper.  Not quite....he was outraged.  I barely got away without being cited for reckless endangerment for getting that far out of the way.  You could have landed a 747 in that medium and had room to spare.  This was California and a merge in any attitude other than the vertical is well within the skill set of your average Grandmother,and in LA especially.  I have been pulled over in lots of states over this land and I would have been loath to step out of the car.  We need laws and procedure that prevents cops from doing dangerous stuff.  They even had to pass a regulation in SD that required the officer to be using his seat belt when the cruiser was in motion and my friends HATED it.   They wanted to be ready to jump out of the car and give foot chase in a pursuit situation.  Pursuit!  Find some way or implement some procedure that prevents the cop from getting out of his cruiser and standing a foot from speeding traffic. We are smart enuf to do that without allowing the public to endure pandemonium at the hands of "scoff laws". Getting clipped by a 30 mph car can kill you outright as well as 65.

I volunteered as a reserve officer many years ago.  I have sympathy and yes, I "give'em a brake".

John
« Last Edit: January 31, 2010, 12:52:58 PM by JohnEd »
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Offline jackhartjr

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Re: Move over laws
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2010, 01:43:49 PM »
I have no problem with the move over laws.
What I have a problem with is states like NC that look for it and write gazillions of tickets for it!
It is being used here as a revenue enhancement moneymaker.
Come to think of it it is that way everywhere!
Jack
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Offline zubzub

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Re: Move over laws
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2010, 02:11:39 PM »
Personally I don't need a law for this I have always done it.  I also move over for any vehicle that has stopped on the shoulder as long as I can do so safely. Oh yeah and bicycle and peds as well.

Offline JackConrad

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Re: Move over laws
« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2010, 03:16:52 PM »
   We would always park a fire engine at an angle across the lane we were working an accident in, between us and the oncoming traffic to deflect anyone hitting it into another lane.  I have had cars & truck pass me on the interstate at 80-90 MPH, literally within 6-10 feet while I was caring for a patient.
   Having been in their position, I alway move over or slow down.  Jack
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Offline wildbob24

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Re: Move over laws
« Reply #10 on: January 31, 2010, 03:24:35 PM »
I'm with Jack and ZubZub.

Having been in the uncomfortable position of being temporarily stranded on the side of the interstate on more than one occasion, I consider it common courtesy to move over for any vehicle parked in the breakdown lane. 

Bob
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Offline Nellie Wilson

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Re: Move over laws
« Reply #11 on: January 31, 2010, 03:50:43 PM »
Amen, WildBob -

How can anybody be so stupid as not to make room. Or at least to slow down? Sad commentary that something so obvious has to be made into a 'law.'

But we all know why, don't we? JackHart nailed it, far as I'm concerned.

Sure, I agree 100% with the principle, but I disagree 100% with the motive... and the stupid sales pitch: Thousands of officers are injured or killed every year... blah, blah blah.

Right. And the Himalayan glaciers are in imminent meltdown mode. And we're gonna go broke if we don't pass Obamacare...

But heck, what do we care? Let's all have fun and let our kids sort through the wreckage.

Rodeo!

Nellie
Had to change a tire... >:(  got to put it on backward... :-\  still trying to fix it on photoshop... ??? ::) ???

cody

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Re: Move over laws
« Reply #12 on: January 31, 2010, 04:27:25 PM »
« Last Edit: January 31, 2010, 04:36:54 PM by cody »

Offline Iceni John

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Re: Move over laws
« Reply #13 on: January 31, 2010, 04:38:06 PM »
As a California resident I have a question:

CVC 21706.5 says that traffic in the opposite lanes of the freeway is not in an "emergency incident zone".   OK, but why are drivers on divided streets (such as Harbor Boulevard running through Costa Mesa that has a grass median some of its length separating the directions of traffic) required to pull over and stop.   If it's essentially impossible to cross the median, and an emergency vehicle is going without delay in one direction, why does all traffic going the opposite direction also have to stop?   I can understand why if it's an undivided road, but why also on a road with a physical barrier running along its median?

Just curious.
John  
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Offline Depewtee

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Re: Move over laws
« Reply #14 on: January 31, 2010, 04:41:33 PM »
In 2003, the International Association of Chiefs of Police established the Law Enforcement Stops and Safety Subcommittee to research officer safety during traffic stops.  Their recommendations fall into three areas 1) the police vehicle 2) highway design and 3) traffic stop policies.  In 2004 the subcommittee released their findings/recommendations. This is a very informative document.

Brian S.
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