Author Topic: Frozen Brakes  (Read 8115 times)

Offline Stormcloud

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Re: Frozen Brakes
« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2012, 02:55:56 PM »
There was definitely water in the system. He commented on water leaving the wet tank more than once when he pulled the release cable. The air shift solenoid for reverse was also acting up when we were trying to get the coach moving...we ended up using a long piece of 2x2 lumber to operate the lever taking the bus out of reverse. Seems he could engage reverse by air but thats all.

We will discuss further the benefits of air dryers,etc. but theres lots of time before the coach is needed.

I'm also quite interested in BWs setup.

Mark
Mark Morgan  
1972 MCI-7 'Papabus'
8v71N MT654 Automatic
 Brandon, Manitoba, Canada in summer
 somewhere around Yuma, Arizona in winter

Offline buswarrior

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Re: Frozen Brakes
« Reply #16 on: December 05, 2012, 08:38:56 PM »
There should be water coming out of the wet tank with no air drier.

The humidity in the air is condensed out of the air sucked in and squeezed by the air compressor.

Most of it will be collected in the wet tank, but the whole system will be humid inside.

It is that humidity that is the devil when it gets cold out.

Yes, on stopping in arctic conditions and chance of wet linings, set the parking brake, position wheel chocks on the down hill side just an inch away from the tires, go back and release the parking brake, and hope it rolls that inch against the chocks.

Works good as long as a lack of air integrity doesn't put them back on shortly...

happy coaching!
buswarrior
Frozen North, Greater Toronto Area

Offline Low Class

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Re: Frozen Brakes
« Reply #17 on: December 06, 2012, 08:24:02 AM »
While I never intend to drive in below freezing temps, I will ask this anyway.

The "book" calls for a special clay based grease for brake components.  Is this a low temperature thing, or is there some other reason?

I use  lithium complex high temp grease for everything from drive shaft to brakes.
Jim Keefauver/1985 Wanderlodge PT36/6V92TA/MT654CR/East Tn.

Offline buswarrior

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Re: Frozen Brakes
« Reply #18 on: December 06, 2012, 07:02:30 PM »
High temperature operating environment is the challenge for brake lubes.

The historical recommendations in older coach manuals have to be considered in the context of the science of lubes back in that day, which is very different than what we enjoy today.

Many of those lube recommendations are way out of date and don't make sense to anyone today.

happy coaching!
buswarrior
Frozen North, Greater Toronto Area