June 23, 2018, 08:48:24 AM

Author Topic: Roof Thickness  (Read 3770 times)

Offline uemjg

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Roof Thickness
« on: July 30, 2013, 10:32:57 PM »
I have an MCI-8 and wondered how thick is the celiing material?  How do walls or shelves usually get mounted?

Offline bevans6

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Re: Roof Thickness
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2013, 11:44:48 PM »
If it's stock there is a 16 gauge aluminum ceiling, about 1.5" of fiberglass matt, then a roof of about .100" aluminum.   The ceiling is not particularly structural but the roof definitely is.  There are steel ribs in behind the rivets.

Brian
1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
Spicer 8844 4 speed Zen meditation device
Tatamagouche, Nova Scotia

Offline uemjg

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Re: Roof Thickness
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2013, 04:30:14 AM »
it seems that the first layer from the inside is plastic...

Offline bevans6

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Re: Roof Thickness
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2013, 12:13:05 PM »
My bus, 1980 MC-5C, the ceiling material is the thin aluminium but it does have a plastic coating.

Brian
1980 MCI MC-5C, 8V-71T from a M-110 self propelled howitzer
Spicer 8844 4 speed Zen meditation device
Tatamagouche, Nova Scotia

Offline RJ

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Re: Roof Thickness
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2013, 11:10:06 PM »
NAME?? -

Most people, when doing an interior of a coach, pull out the original ceiling material to better insulate the vehicle (best is spray foam).

In so doing, the structural ribs are exposed, thus allowing you access to points significantly strong enough to hang cabinets, secure walls, run electrical, etc.

The same applies when you pull the original wall panels, too.

FWIW & HTH. . .

 ;)
RJ Long
PD4106-2784 No More
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6V71/MT-644
S14947 1980 MC-5C Shell
6V92/HT-740
Cheney WA

Offline TomC

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Re: Roof Thickness
« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2013, 04:01:50 PM »
I stripped my interior all the way down. It exposed two cracks above each door-not a surprise being a transit bus with hundreds of openings and closings a day. I welded up the cracks, steel brushed everything then primed it all with Rustoleum. I then installed 1x2 fir strips to be able to anchor the roof and walls to. I also installed a 1x3 doug fir strip to support my overhead cabinets (they're still up after nearly 40,000 miles of driving). I then had American Foam come in and spray foam everything to have 2.25" of insulation. Then covered the ceiling with 1/8" plywood (it conformed to the curve of the ceiling) and 1/4" plywood over the walls. Have always been pleased with the insulation-makes for easy cooling and heating. I was just came down from Mammoth and it was 97 degrees out. I ran just the front and rear roof air and it was 72 degrees inside going down the road. Good Luck, TomC
Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.

Offline Seangie

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Re: Re: Roof Thickness
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2013, 03:34:25 AM »
I spent the extra time and money and did like tom by insulating between the frame, wrapping reflectix over the frame, additing furring strips and more insulation.  You can read about the wall insulation here:http://www.herdofturtles.org/2012/08/27/new-walls-funny-math/

Spend every penny on the most insulation you can put in.  I can tell you now that I'm glad I did and it makes a big difference.

-Sean

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1984 Eagle Model 10S
'Cause you know we,
we live in a van (Eagle 10 Suburban)
Driving through the night
To that old promised land'