Author Topic: -4°F Northern Michigan in Coach  (Read 5069 times)

Offline Scott & Heather

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Re: -4°F Northern Michigan in Coach
« Reply #15 on: December 22, 2016, 06:39:23 PM »
Jim those look like a nice system. Simple too. I could plumb it in at the Heater core up front too if I wanted to


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Scott & Heather
1984 MCI 9 6V92-turbo with 9 inch roof raise (SOLD)
1992 MCI 102C3 8v92-turbo with 8 inch roof raise CURRENT HOME
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Offline Jim Eh.

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Re: -4°F Northern Michigan in Coach
« Reply #16 on: December 25, 2016, 11:37:10 PM »
Not too sure on the amount heat loss by the time it got back to the engine block but sure would be instant heat in the cockpit as soon as you fired up  ;)
Jim Eh.
1996 MC12
6V92TA / HT741D
Winnipeg, MB.

Offline Oonrahnjay

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Re: -4°F Northern Michigan in Coach
« Reply #17 on: December 26, 2016, 04:44:49 AM »
  Not too sure on the amount heat loss by the time it got back to the engine block but sure would be instant heat in the cockpit as soon as you fired up  ;) 

      Lots of details would be different, but VW doesn't cast blocks for the TDI diesel (Jetta, Passat, Golf in N America) with freeze plugs so it's impossible to fit an ordinary element-type block heater.  A small company has come up with a system that uses one of those Temro heaters (it's just a kit with the heater, electrical cable and connector, brackets, and replacement hoses with correct length and bends).
      Of course, a bus engine would be different (10 L vs. 1.9), but that system works like a charm -- warm engine to start, instant defrost and interior heat, etc.  I'm gonna guess that one of the "in-line" heaters would be very useful in a bus. 
      VW "dealer accessories" offered a stick-on oil pan heater - I never tried one but the people who did said that they helped a little but there wasn't a lot of heat to the top of the engine and they had a habit of falling off the pan!  I think if I lived in a really cold area, I'd have an antifreeze (or block) heater and an oil pan heater, too.  But for VWs, the in-line seems to be the ticket.
Bruce H; Wallace (near Wilmington) NC
1976 Daimler (British) Double-Decker Bus; 34' long

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Offline MB LeMirage

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Re: -4°F Northern Michigan in Coach
« Reply #18 on: December 26, 2016, 09:07:58 AM »
I had an inline heater on my old caterpillar D4 and it worked awesome. We could fire the old beast up at temps down to the -30s C. Just a $60 Tempro unit from Canadian Tire, but boy oh boy it was the best thing I ever did to that machine.
Ryan
Ryan D.
1980 Prevost LeMirage
8v71n 6spd Manual
Ste Genevive M.B.

Offline Jim Eh.

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Re: -4°F Northern Michigan in Coach
« Reply #19 on: December 26, 2016, 04:25:27 PM »
On my 7.3L pick up I disconnected the block heater and just use the Temro. They work better, when properly installed, because they circulate by inversion just that much better.

A note on oil pan heaters... oil when heated tends to separate into layers so basically you are just heating the first 1/2" to 3/4" above the bottom of the oil pan. Not really worth the electricity to drive it.
Jim Eh.
1996 MC12
6V92TA / HT741D
Winnipeg, MB.

Offline Scott & Heather

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Re: -4°F Northern Michigan in Coach
« Reply #20 on: December 26, 2016, 07:21:43 PM »
Jim, if the coolant is circulating constantly, heat loss wouldn't be too bad. The coolant lines are inside the insulated tunnel.


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Scott & Heather
1984 MCI 9 6V92-turbo with 9 inch roof raise (SOLD)
1992 MCI 102C3 8v92-turbo with 8 inch roof raise CURRENT HOME
Click link for 900 photos of our 1st bus conversion:
https://goo.gl/photos/GVtNRniG2RBXPuXW9

Offline RJ

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Re: -4°F Northern Michigan in Coach
« Reply #21 on: December 26, 2016, 08:39:35 PM »
Scott -

1st priority is getting that big old 92-series fired up, thus a coolant/block heater on the engine itself.

2nd would be a supplemental coolant heater for the defroster, especially with those big C-series windshields.

3rd to eliminate the use of starting fluid, unless you're planning on rebuilding your engine from its use.

My coach has a block heater, which has been used often over the last couple of years. I have a switch inside to turn it on - a couple hours later she'll fire right up just like it's 70* outside.

Consider it an investment, not an expense!

FWIW & HTH...

 ;)
RJ Long
PD4106-2784 No More
S13406 1978 MC-5C Converted 6V71/MT-644
S14947 1980 MC-5C Shell 6V92/HT-740
Cheney WA

Offline Scott & Heather

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Re: -4°F Northern Michigan in Coach
« Reply #22 on: December 27, 2016, 05:49:43 AM »
Nice! I like the switch idea. On my 9 I had to go out and plug it in every time.


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Scott & Heather
1984 MCI 9 6V92-turbo with 9 inch roof raise (SOLD)
1992 MCI 102C3 8v92-turbo with 8 inch roof raise CURRENT HOME
Click link for 900 photos of our 1st bus conversion:
https://goo.gl/photos/GVtNRniG2RBXPuXW9

Offline Dave5Cs

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Re: -4°F Northern Michigan in Coach
« Reply #23 on: December 27, 2016, 08:19:03 AM »
RJ where is your Block heater screwed into the block. right side or on the front behind the dip stick tube?
Dave5cs
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 1998 Jeep TJ (PFTOED)