Author Topic: Repairing Wheel Well Rust  (Read 295 times)

Offline Jcparmley

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Repairing Wheel Well Rust
« on: September 09, 2019, 02:54:50 PM »
I thought I would start a new thread rather than continue the "sign panel skin buckled" thread.  When I pulled the sign panel and the interior floor I noticed the short steel beams that are over the rear wheel wells are rusted through.  THey all need replaced.  The two large beams that run front to back are in good shape and sold.  So I need to take the wheels of and get in the wheel well to weld new beams, rebuild the metal wheel well shields and seal everything off. 

My plan was block the bus up and call a road service and have them remove the wheels.  I have no idea how long they have been on the bus and as of now I don't have the tools to do it alone.  So my question is:  after I have the wheels off to rebuild the wheel wells what else should I R&R.  Now might be the time to look for and repair anything that might become a problem.  What do you all do as yearly maintenance on your wheels?  I hear many recomend that you remove the wheels each year to do annual maintenance.  Also, my original bus (102c3) has Alcoa rims, are they worth putting on the new bus?
« Last Edit: September 09, 2019, 02:58:40 PM by Jcparmley »
1996 MCI 102dl3
Series 60 12.7 w/ Allison B500 Retarder
470 HP/ 1550 TQ
A work in progress

Offline Jcparmley

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Re: Repairing Wheel Well Rust
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2019, 06:22:18 PM »
Are Alcoa wheels worth switching over to?
1996 MCI 102dl3
Series 60 12.7 w/ Allison B500 Retarder
470 HP/ 1550 TQ
A work in progress

Offline chessie4905

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Re: Repairing Wheel Well Rust
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2019, 06:52:08 PM »
They are so common now, much cheaper to get a set used. However it is somewhat pricey to buy the longer wheel studs required for the thicker aluminum. There are many places that polish used wheels, making them look like new.
GMC h8h 649#028 (4905)
Pennsylvania-central

Offline Jcparmley

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Re: Repairing Wheel Well Rust
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2019, 07:07:03 PM »
I already have the Alcoa wheels on my other "parts" bus, I am just wondering if they are really worth removing on one bus and putting them on my conversion bus?  I'm trying to figure out if it is worth the trouble. 

They are so common now, much cheaper to get a set used. However it is somewhat pricey to buy the longer wheel studs required for the thicker aluminum. There are many places that polish used wheels, making them look like new.
1996 MCI 102dl3
Series 60 12.7 w/ Allison B500 Retarder
470 HP/ 1550 TQ
A work in progress

Offline chessie4905

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Re: Repairing Wheel Well Rust
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2019, 04:18:39 AM »
Well then you can swap the hubs, avoiding the major cost of changing. Less weight, easier dismounting of tires, no constant touch up and repaint of steel wheels, they run truer and dissipate brake heat better. And they look pretty when polished.
GMC h8h 649#028 (4905)
Pennsylvania-central

Offline buswarrior

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Re: Repairing Wheel Well Rust
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2019, 09:17:15 AM »
Pros and cons to both wheel types.

There are "go-no go" gauges for wheels. The fastener contact on stud pilot are capable of wearing. Get 'em from the manufacturer.

Used wheels are used for a reason... busnut needs to be very careful checking for cracks and the above wear. Who dumps a good wheel???

Aluminium rims don't bend when you whack 'em hard into a curb/etc, they crack/shatter... steel will bend...

Major fleets to this day go either way, aluminium or steel, each for really good reasons.

School yourself up, pick yer poison?

Happy coaching!
Buswarrior
Frozen North, Greater Toronto Area

Offline ol713

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Re: Repairing Wheel Well Rust
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2019, 05:20:05 PM »

Hi;
    A simple tool to purchase, is a torque multiplier. They can be had for $40 - $50 on Ebay.
    You will need it sooner or later.  Sounds like you will need sooner.

                                                          Good luck,   Merle.

Offline Jcparmley

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Re: Repairing Wheel Well Rust
« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2019, 02:40:09 PM »
I will check the condition.  They are on the 102c3 bus I have so I was going to switch them and put them on the 102Dl3 that I have.  Just a swap really.  I just didn't know if it was worth the effort.  A torque multiplier is a good idea.

Pros and cons to both wheel types.

There are "go-no go" gauges for wheels. The fastener contact on stud pilot are capable of wearing. Get 'em from the manufacturer.

Used wheels are used for a reason... busnut needs to be very careful checking for cracks and the above wear. Who dumps a good wheel???

Aluminium rims don't bend when you whack 'em hard into a curb/etc, they crack/shatter... steel will bend...

Major fleets to this day go either way, aluminium or steel, each for really good reasons.

School yourself up, pick yer poison?

Happy coaching!
Buswarrior
1996 MCI 102dl3
Series 60 12.7 w/ Allison B500 Retarder
470 HP/ 1550 TQ
A work in progress

Offline chessie4905

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Re: Repairing Wheel Well Rust
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2019, 04:20:41 AM »
Don't forget stud length and do the hubs also unless you plan to press them out, and press them in the other hubs. Good chance to check condition of wheel bearings and change oil or repack, depending which you have.
GMC h8h 649#028 (4905)
Pennsylvania-central