Author Topic: Relocating Wabesto  (Read 4355 times)

Offline Geoff

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Re: Relocating Wabesto
« Reply #15 on: September 23, 2019, 02:28:23 PM »
A Webasto mounted by itself and not inside an Aqua Hot is easy to work on.  But I had a learning curve with mine and spent a lot on parts until I had it all figured out.  I wish I would have had the factory testing unit from the start, I have one now and haven't had to use it, but it would have saved me a lot of time and money.

In any case, I love my Webasto when I'm camping.
Geoff
'82 RTS AZ

Offline richard5933

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Re: Relocating Wabesto
« Reply #16 on: September 23, 2019, 02:45:20 PM »
We had a Webasto on our 4106. Cost about $500 to have Lloyd rebuild/clean it. Ran like a champ after that. Wish we had one on the current bus, as it could preheat the engine while heating the interior of the coach.
Richard
1974 GMC P8M4108a-125 (Custom Coach "Land Cruiser")
1964 GM PD4106-2412 (Former Bus)
Located in beautiful Wisconsin
KD9GRB

Offline Jim Blackwood

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Re: Relocating Wabesto
« Reply #17 on: September 23, 2019, 04:52:28 PM »
I did not plan on having a Webasto (Eiberspacher actually but close enough to the same thing) and expected to use a propane furnace for heating. I still am likely to install a propane furnace but it's great to know I don't have to. Plus I suspect my time between refueling runs will be extended by using diesel to heat with. I very much like the idea of having multiple options for heat. It wasn't difficult to clean up and get it operating, certainly worth the minimal expense and effort of wiring in a thermostat controller instead of a timer. I think I will like it but also think I will want to eventually re-plumb it with some control valves to direct the heat to the engine or coach as desired.

I think it looks like it could probably be moved down. I'm not planning to do that but I expect there is room, although I haven't looked with an eye towards doing that. I don't think it would be very heavy. It's mostly hollow and the stainless it's built from doesn't seem particularly thick. Provided there is room, it seems to me that lowering it would be better than moving it to a storage bay.

Jim
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Knowledge without Wisdom, now that's just plain dangerous.

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Offline Jcparmley

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Re: Relocating Wabesto
« Reply #18 on: September 23, 2019, 06:31:14 PM »
That's a good point on lowering it instead of moving it into the bay.  I am still debating on wether to use it for heat in the coach.  I have a 420000 BTU propane furnace for the rear of the coach and I was planing on putting a tiny wood stove used in sailboats for the front half.  I mostly need to get the Wabesto hooked up for proper engine heat as that's how the series 60 was designed.  I'm just trying to get the factory mechanicals put back together.  I also need to get new fan clutches as mine have been bypassed and the fans run whenever the engine is on.  Lots to do!!

I did not plan on having a Webasto (Eiberspacher actually but close enough to the same thing) and expected to use a propane furnace for heating. I still am likely to install a propane furnace but it's great to know I don't have to. Plus I suspect my time between refueling runs will be extended by using diesel to heat with. I very much like the idea of having multiple options for heat. It wasn't difficult to clean up and get it operating, certainly worth the minimal expense and effort of wiring in a thermostat controller instead of a timer. I think I will like it but also think I will want to eventually re-plumb it with some control valves to direct the heat to the engine or coach as desired.

I think it looks like it could probably be moved down. I'm not planning to do that but I expect there is room, although I haven't looked with an eye towards doing that. I don't think it would be very heavy. It's mostly hollow and the stainless it's built from doesn't seem particularly thick. Provided there is room, it seems to me that lowering it would be better than moving it to a storage bay.

Jim
1996 MCI 102dl3
Series 60 12.7 w/ Allison B500 Retarder
470 HP/ 1550 TQ
A work in progress

Offline windtrader

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Re: Relocating Wabesto
« Reply #19 on: September 24, 2019, 07:45:28 PM »
It'd be hard to convince me to swap out the Webasto system in my bus. It's basically central heating as there are ducts in different parts of the coach. Has connections to heat block as needed. Loop for hot water. Configured so each duct can be tuned for desired heat output. Thermostats and fan speed in each room for individual control in addition to flow adjustments for each zone.

Best part it runs diesel. Personally, propane is more hassle than just diesel only. One more place to stop. Currently, just running the stove top that hardly uses any. Running the refrig on propane goes about two weeks. It's used while on the road, between poles.

Don F
1976 MCI/TMC MC-8 #1286
Fully converted
Bought 2017

Offline TomC

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Re: Relocating Wabesto
« Reply #20 on: September 24, 2019, 08:18:33 PM »
Recycling circular file = trash can.
Tom & Donna Christman. '77 AMGeneral 10240B; 8V-71TATAIC V730.

Online chessie4905

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Re: Relocating Wabesto
« Reply #21 on: September 24, 2019, 08:28:41 PM »
Your setup is nice, but are we talking 2 to 3 thousand dollars for the whole install, including webasto? Then periodic service and repair. Other than an additional fuel source, propane furnaces are pretty trouble free. Since you have a generator, you can run it to operate the block heater or plumb cooling system into engines system. If somebody is full timing it, I can see where a Wabasto or one of the other oil fired ones makes more sense.
GMC h8h 649#028 (4905)
Pennsylvania-central

Offline richard5933

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Re: Relocating Wabesto
« Reply #22 on: September 25, 2019, 02:26:54 AM »
Your setup is nice, but are we talking 2 to 3 thousand dollars for the whole install, including webasto? Then periodic service and repair. Other than an additional fuel source, propane furnaces are pretty trouble free. Since you have a generator, you can run it to operate the block heater or plumb cooling system into engines system. If somebody is full timing it, I can see where a Wabasto or one of the other oil fired ones makes more sense.

Someone using the bus through the winter would also benefit from a Webasto or similar system. Running the generator to use a block heater means having to start a diesel generator in cold temps, which on its own can sometimes be problematic. Our 4106 used the Webasto to preheat the engine, and since the Perkins was tied into the main bus's cooling system it also could preheat the Perkins. If nothing else, I'd keep one around for that if I had the option and was doing a lot of winter camping.
Richard
1974 GMC P8M4108a-125 (Custom Coach "Land Cruiser")
1964 GM PD4106-2412 (Former Bus)
Located in beautiful Wisconsin
KD9GRB

Online luvrbus

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Re: Relocating Wabesto
« Reply #23 on: September 25, 2019, 04:26:47 AM »
I installed the Propex forced air propane heater in the van the propane RV furnace used to much propane ,it is rated for 10,000 BTU but seems to put out a lot of heat on a gal of propane every 8 hrs and uses 1.9 amps for the fan
Life is short drink the good wine first

Offline sledhead

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Re: Relocating Wabesto
« Reply #24 on: September 25, 2019, 04:44:13 AM »
" the Propex forced air propane heater "

Look like nice units and not a lot of money if a guy wanted propane heat
My diesel home grown system works amazing ! very happy 

dave
dave , karen
1990 mci 102c  6v92 ta ht740  kit,living room slide .... sold
2000 featherlite vogue vantare 550 hp 3406e  cat
1875 lbs torque  home base huntsville ontario canada

Online luvrbus

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Re: Relocating Wabesto
« Reply #25 on: September 25, 2019, 05:18:53 AM »
" the Propex forced air propane heater "

Look like nice units and not a lot of money if a guy wanted propane heat
My diesel home grown system works amazing ! very happy 

dave


I have no choice lol I kept the factory furnace,the Propex will not raise the heat as fast the furnace it takes a little longer but does the job on less propane 
Life is short drink the good wine first

Online chessie4905

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Re: Relocating Wabesto
« Reply #26 on: September 25, 2019, 06:02:04 AM »
If you use air ducts to your water bays for winter use, no reason you couldn't plumb a little heat to generator compartment. Enough to keep it to 40° to 50° shouldnt tax the system much.
GMC h8h 649#028 (4905)
Pennsylvania-central

Offline Jim Blackwood

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Re: Relocating Wabesto
« Reply #27 on: September 25, 2019, 07:06:45 AM »
I'm not a big fan of the idea of ripping out one system to replace it with something else unless the first system is proven to be inferior or unrepairable. This goes for the OTR air as well as the webasto. The original system puts out something like 80K-90K BTU of heat and that should be well in excess of needs if it is all being used appropriately. But there's no point in heating the engine if it isn't going to be started. The stock MCI system gives preference to keeping the engine warm which was sensible considering the use of the bus. For RV use, flow to the engine needs to be shut off, which means installing at least one valve, which means draining the coolant. But after that's done you have a system that can easily keep the coach toasty warm, and has pretty even heat distribution if you didn't rip out the airflow ducts. For the most part they can be concealed behind cabinets and furniture. It also shouldn't be hard to duct some heat into the storage bays, the rear one has access to the main heater matrix.

It makes a little noise (not bad) and there's diesel exhaust to deal with, but it's convenient and pretty easy. Might even be feasible to duct the output of a propane furnace into the same airways.

Jim
Information, without Knowledge, is useless.

Knowledge without Wisdom, now that's just plain dangerous.

Opinion and fact being equally persuasive, just give me the facts and I'll distort them as I please.

Online luvrbus

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Re: Relocating Wabesto
« Reply #28 on: September 25, 2019, 07:15:19 AM »
All it takes when using a diesel fired heating system are the small heat exchangers less work and takes less space than ducts.I had those in each bay of my Eagle and the fans have very little draw plus mine had a thermostat for each bay,this is what I use they come in all kinds of configuration's 1 to 3 fans .I have a dozen or more of these I going dispose of when I clean the shop out this winter   
Life is short drink the good wine first

Offline Jcparmley

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Re: Relocating Wabesto
« Reply #29 on: September 25, 2019, 09:23:31 AM »
Got it, thanks for the translation.  I must have had a senior moment.

Recycling circular file = trash can.
1996 MCI 102dl3
Series 60 12.7 w/ Allison B500 Retarder
470 HP/ 1550 TQ
A work in progress