Author Topic: Does this exist?  (Read 2960 times)

HighTechRedneck

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Does this exist?
« on: May 12, 2007, 04:24:34 PM »
I've done a little googling but not getting results so it probably doesn't exist but I thought I would ask.

Is there such a thing as a non-electric key switch that directly/manually operates an air valve?

Offline Stan

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Re: Does this exist?
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2007, 05:20:10 PM »
Are you looking for a manual air valve that you open and close with a key?

Sojourner

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Re: Does this exist?
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2007, 05:38:18 PM »
Enter "locking miniature air valve" in Google & found one:

http://www.kuhnkeusa.com/pdf/manually_operated/key_wobble.pdf

I am sure there more.

FWIW

Sojourn for Christ, Jerry

HighTechRedneck

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Re: Does this exist?
« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2007, 07:08:44 PM »
Thanks for the link Jerry.  I'm not sure that one is secure enough, but it is a start.  I may end up using an electric key switch to drive a solenoid valve after all.

What I am doing is this.  I saw a post last week that caught my interest about using a separate air tank to drive the air operated doors.  That poster was planning a remote r/c key switch to operate it from the outside. 

I too am keeping my air operated door for now (budget priorities) and like the idea of a separate air tank with a small air pump to keep it up as needed.  It would have a line from the main tank with a one way check valve so that when the main tank is pressurized it will keep the door tank charged.  But when the main tank goes down while parked, the door tank would be isolated by the check valve and would be manintained by the small electric pump.

But I like things a little more manual when it comes to entry access.  So I am thinking about a keyed air valve to open it from the outside.  It would be installed parallel to the door's emergency dump valve on the inside.  By doing this I would accomplish the following objectives:

  • Keyed entry access from the outside.
  • Ability to open the door from the inside, at the door location, but out of reach of children (just in case I ever have any on board).
  • Retain the ability to open the door from the driver seat.
  • Fail safe against lockout in the event of system failure because no pressure = no lock.


Offline Tim Strommen

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Re: Does this exist?
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2007, 07:34:46 PM »
HighTech,

    This is an interesting idea...  if you are exited enough to try it yourself, you could concievably use a Household dead-bolt lockset and a momentary push-in valve.  You would need to drill into the bolt (the part that goes into the door jamb of a doorframe), then tap it for the thread of the valve handle.  With a simple bracket, you can put the whole "works" in the door or the adjacent wall.  You can then either use the standard lever-type inside action to control the door from the passenger space - or put in a common blank plate to block it out.  By turning the key, you will either extend or retract the bolt.  This action can be captured to actuate the momentary valve the way you want.

Then the "lock" will be fairly secure, yet something you can easily repair in the field - and keys can be made at just about any hardware shop.

Cheers!

-Tim
Fremont, CA
1984 Gillig Phantom 40/102
DD 6V92TA (MUI, 275HP) - Allison HT740
Conversion Progress: 10% (9-years invested, 30 to go :))

HighTechRedneck

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Re: Does this exist?
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2007, 07:48:42 PM »
Thanks Tim!  I like that idea.  I wanted to keep the setup as simple and that would achieve that goal.

Offline Tim Strommen

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Re: Does this exist?
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2007, 08:24:07 PM »
To adress the "child-proof" aspect, there are a few manufacturers that make security dead-bolts with a key on the inside that looks like the common lever-type handle - only it can be removed (and placed somewhere the kids can't get to - like a cabinet above the door).  The rest of the time, you can simply leave it in the lock.

If you want to avoid drilling, there are a lot of companies that make lever action or push-in valves specifically for an object to rub or press against it to activate it (and they are fairly cheap - I found a couple examples at http://www.stcvalve.com) around $30.

Personally, I'm more comfortable with the idea of drilling into the bolt and screwing in a valve shaft.  This way you can have a cinch nut and some thread-lock to ensure it stays attached and actuates with the lock action (a bent lever on a valve can keep you out of your rig if it's the only way in... :-\).

I see that STC has a shaft type momentary (spring return) valve in several plumbing variants.

Cheers!

-Tim
« Last Edit: May 12, 2007, 09:39:08 PM by Tim Strommen »
Fremont, CA
1984 Gillig Phantom 40/102
DD 6V92TA (MUI, 275HP) - Allison HT740
Conversion Progress: 10% (9-years invested, 30 to go :))

Offline Jerry32

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Re: Does this exist?
« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2007, 04:02:32 AM »
My air operated door is electrically controlled? All that would be needed is a keylock switch to replace the outside manual switch. Jerry
1988 MCI 102A3 8V92TA 740

Offline wrench

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Re: Does this exist?
« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2007, 05:47:59 AM »
  The semi-tractor use one of those brake parking valve with a key, that may work.
            wrench

Offline Busted Knuckle

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Re: Does this exist?
« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2007, 11:54:51 AM »
Setra's (at least all the old ones I've been around '88-'95 models) have a key switch on the dash that locks & unlocks the luggage bays by air. What is even neater is that it can lock all bays, the right side bays, left side bays, or all unlocked by which posistion you put the switch in! Just a thought! FWIW BK  ;D
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Offline wvanative

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Re: Does this exist?
« Reply #10 on: May 16, 2007, 04:14:19 AM »
Setra's (at least all the old ones I've been around '88-'95 models) have a key switch on the dash that locks & unlocks the luggage bays by air. What is even neater is that it can lock all bays, the right side bays, left side bays, or all unlocked by which posistion you put the switch in! Just a thought! FWIW BK  ;D
Hey BK, I hope this is not a dumb question but, what would happen if you had a total loss of air? Would you still be able to unlock the bay doors and get in to where your tools are, or to the luggage of your passangers if you were driving a charter? 

WvaNative
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belfert

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Re: Does this exist?
« Reply #11 on: May 16, 2007, 06:23:27 AM »
My Dina has air lock baggage doors and, no, you can't open them if you have no air.  There are two spots to attach an air chuck to open the baggage doors if there is no air.  (They are inside the bus.)  I removed all of the air locks to make it easier to get into the luggage bays.

Offline wvanative

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Re: Does this exist?
« Reply #12 on: May 16, 2007, 09:23:35 AM »
Thanks Belfert,  I had a feeling that might be a problem with air locks, plus if your entry door was on the same system you could really have a problem.

WvaNative
Dean Hamilton Villa Grove, IL East Central IL. Near Champaign
Still Dreaming and planning

HighTechRedneck

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Re: Does this exist?
« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2007, 10:14:06 AM »
... plus if your entry door was on the same system you could really have a problem.

WvaNative

That would depend on how it was implemented.  In my situation, since I am keeping the pneumatic doors for now, loss of air pressure means they are unlocked.  This is because instead of an air operated bolt locking the door, the air pressure holds the doors shut.